Patty McKinley's Genealogy

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51 1920 US Federal Census Wicksburg & Jellico, Houston Co., AL
Strickland Bailey age 27 born in FL(?) both parents born in GA (?) wife Arrie age 24 born in AL both parents born in AL son Haley D age 7 born in AL son Morris H age 3 4/12 born in AL son Lanson (?) age 2 6/12 born in AL
1930 US Census Wicksburg, Houston Co., AL
Strickland Bailey age 38 born in AL both parents born in AL wife Arrie age 32 born in AL both parents born in AL son Maskin age 16 son Hurbert age 14 son Lanson age 12 son JD age 6 daughter Vencie daughter age 10 mos Allie age 10 mos? (Very difficult to read) 
Family F812
 
52 1930 United States Federal Census Alabama Geneva Lowrey and Davis Schoolhouse District 7 Sheet 18 A
Odum Ashley age 29 born in AL Father born in GA and Mother in AL Occupation Farmer wife Leona age 20 born in AL father born in Fl Mother in AL daughter Louise age 2 years and 3 mos. born in AL 
Odom, Ashley (I747)
 
53 1930 United States Federal Census Alabama Geneva Lowrey and Davis Schoolhouse District 7 Sheet 18 A District 7 Sheet 18 A
Odum Ashley age 29 born in AL Father born in GA and Mother in AL Occupation Farmer wife Leona age 20 born in AL father born in Fl Mother in AL daughter Louise age 2 years and 3 mos. born in AL 
Family F311
 
54 1930 United States Federal Census Indiana Sullivan Co Turman Twp District 25
McKinley William R age 51 occupation Farmer born in IN wife Clara A age 49 born in IN daughter Jewell M age 19 born in IN son Thomas W age 17 born in IN 
McKinley, William Richard (I1435)
 
55 1930 US Census Bonifay, Holmes Co., FL District 27
Strickland James D age value of home or monthly rent $600 age 54 born in AL both parents born in AL occupation Blacksmith wife Ada age 28 born in FL Father born in FL Mother born in AL son Porter D age 14 born in AL works in sawmill doing odd jobs daughter Ruth V age 10 born in FL son Loyce D age 7 born in FL 
Family F1226
 
56 1930 US Federal Census Union Holmes Co., FL District 18 Page 4A
Pelham, William C age 50 born inAL both parents born in AL Occupation Grocery Store Clerk wife Sarah L age 48 born in AL both parents born in AL 
Family F336
 
57 A James Russell married Mary (Polly) McKinley, 12 Feb 1817 in Nelson County KY. Is Mary a sister to David and James a brother to Elizabeth?
I am placing them as such for now. 
McKinley, David (I1514)
 
58 A Newsletter Publication of First United Methodist Church, Jackson, Tennessee September 22, 2004 [bullet] Vol. 3 No. 38
Sunday, September 26
Prayer WORSHIP ONE
IV. Unity in Community
Deuteronomy 6:1-9; Luke 10:25-37
David O. Weatherly, preaching
First Awakening Service 8:30 a.m. [bullet] Clayton Hall
Music to be led by the First Awakening musicians.
Worship Service [bullet] 10:50 a.m. [bullet] Sanctuary
Music led by the Sanctuary Choir
Flowers
The flowers on the altar are placed in loving memory of
Ted and Jama Cunliffe by Pat and C.J. Rorie,
Mike, Cathy and Patrick.
The flowers in Disciple Hall are placed in loving memory of
John A. Harris, Sr., by Mrs. John A. Harris, Sr.
John A. Harris, Jr. and David Harris. 
Family F1112
 
59 According to David Lawrence's draft card he was a coal miner and worked for the Interstate Mining Co. located in Glendora, IN

United States Federal Census 1920 Hamilton Twp Sullivan Co., IN Roll T625- 466 Page 5A Enumeration District 254 Image 986
McKinley, Lawrence age 25 born in IN both parents born in IN occupation Coal Miner wife Gladys age 20 born in IN both parents born in IN 
McKinley, David Lawrence (I148)
 
60 age of 77 listed on census with brother James Herd Hinson, Elizabeth (I3726)
 
61 Alonzo McKinley is found on the 1880 census for Haddon Twp., Sullivan Co., IN. with his sister Elizabeth ROBBINS, his age is 21 and occupation is laborer.
1900 U.S. Census for Sullivan Co., Haddon Twp. as follows: McKinley, Alonzo birth Dec 1859 age 41 occupation is farmer and states that both his parents were born in IN. Enumerated with him are, his wife Eliza birth June 1863, age 36 both parent born in KY. son Wm. born in April 1884, age 16 daughter Elizabeth born June 1886 age 13 son John born May (??) 1889 age 11 daughter Lulu born May (??) 1889 age 11 son Comodore born Jan 1899 age 1. *Note from Patty* John and Lula are twins and were born April 21, 1889
1910 U.S. Census Sullivan Co. Haddon Twp. IN McKinley, Alonzo age 48 born in IN. wife Eliza age 47 born in IN. son William age 25 born in IN. son John age 21 born in IN daughter-in-law Flossie age 18 born in IN. son Dewey age 11 born in IN.
1920 Census Sullivan Co., Haddon Twp. Alonzo age 58, with his wife Eliza, age 56 and his sons Dewey, age 21, and William, no age is given for William. His occupation is farming. Eliza's parents born in KY. and Alonzo's in IN.
1930 Census of Haddon Twp., Sullivan Co., IN. Alonzo age 69 and son William age 48. Their occupations are farming and it says Alonzo was married at age 18. Both were born in IN. and both parents born in IN. as well.

The Carlisle News - Carlisle, Sullivan Co., IN. Friday March 10, 1939
"LON MCKINLEY KILLED BY AUTO"
"Fatally Injured in Carlisle Saturday Night. Dies soon after reaching Hospital. Verdict of Accidental Death Given. Funeral Tuesday".
-Alonzo McKinley, well known Haddon Township retired farmer, was fatally injured at about 6:15 o'clock Saturday evening when he was struck by an automobile driven by Ocie Black of this city, the accident occuring on Highway 41, in front of the Oakley store in Carlisle. Black and Chellious (Jack) Moore were driving at a slow rate of speed and were headed south. The driver did not see Mr. McKinley but felt the car hit some object and immediately pulled to the curb on the Ogle Service Station side of the street. Mr. McKinley had just left the office of Dr. J.S. Brown and had walked into the path of the car. Coroner Hubert Wagner, at the inquest, gave the cause of death as accidental and Black was not held. A driving rain at the time made visibility difficult. Mr. McKinley was carried to the sidewalk and was rushed to the Mary Sherman Hospital at Sullivan in a Risinger and Kreage ambulance but died a few minutes after reaching the hospital. Both legs were broken and he had suffered a fractured skull.
Mr. McKinley was born on a farm adjoining the present McKinley farm three miles southwest of Carlisle on December 25, 1861, and was 77 years, 2 months and 9 days of age at the time of his death. He was the son of John McKinley. His wife, who before her marriage was Eliza Cook, departed this life on December 27, 1929.
The deceased is survived by four children as follows: William, who made his home with his father; John E., of Toledo Ohio; Dewey of near Carlisle; and Mrs. Thomas (Lulu) Bowen, of near Carlisle. He is also survived by a brother Charles E. McKinley, of Shelbyville, Ill., and by nine grandchildren. A daughter Mrs. Edgar Willis, also precedes him in death. The grandchildren are Ellsworth McKinley, of Columbus, Ohio, Mrs. Sam Lindsey of Midland, Michigan, Miss Frances Willis of Terre Haute, Robert and Doris Jean McKinley, of Toledo, Ohio and Willard, Ruth, Norma and Ronald McKinley of near Carlisle. Following his death at the hospital Mr. McKinley's body was brought to the Risinger & Kreage Funeral Home here and taken to the home Sunday afternoon. Funeral services were conducted from the Carlisle Christian Church at 2:00 o'clock Tuesday afternoon, the services being in charge of Rev. Bolton, pastor of the Shaker Prairie Christian Church. Burial was made in the Carlisle Oddfellows Cemetery.
*Note from Patty* This newspaper clipping states that Alonzo was born in 1861, however Alonzo is found on the 1860 census at 1 year of age, so he would have had to have been born in 1859. 
McKinley, Alonzo (I44)
 
62 Ambrose was murdered by Owen Jenkins in Barnwell Co., SC. A reward
of $200.00 was offered for his arrest.
# Title: Rootsweb World Connect Publication: http://worldconnect.genealogy.rootsweb.com
Text: Kozdras Family Tree
http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:2190265&id=I76
Contact: David Kozdras
ID: I76
Name: Ambrose PELHAM
Sex: M
Birth: 1740 in Virginia
Death: FEB 1802 in Barnwell District,South Carolina
Note:
Ambrose was murdered near Barnwell County, South Carolina by Owen Jenkins. A reward of 200 dollars was offered for his arrest. Ambrose, in 1790, is living near both John and Uriah Pellum (Pelham), probably his brothers. In 1800, Uriah is no longer living in South Carolina, but Ambrose and John are still near each other. Ambrose was killed in late 1801 or early 1802 by Owen Jenkins. Jenkins was branded with an "M" on his thumb and released.
Jeannette Pelham has Ambrose with a possible first name of James, the same for Ambrose J r.
The following is a transcription of the inventory of his estate:
"A Inventory of the goods and chattels 0f Ambrose Pellum ___?___ (believe to be shorthand fo r "described") Ver'id and approved by us_________________.
Doll___
To lost___1 grey mare___________ 60
1 grey gelden_________ 35
1 bay mare___________ 15
12 head of meat cattle____ 72
14 head of hogs_________ 54
1 set of blacksmiths tools__ 20
1 grindstone_____________ 3
1 steal ????_____________ 1.50
1 loome or lume__________ 6
3 iron pots & other kitchen furniture 13
1 half hogshead_____________ 75
1 lot of plow hoes axes and other old ? 10
1 lot of old iron______________ 8
1 sifter and bottles__________ 1
3 old saddles and bridles_______ 8
3 reaping hooks_______________ 75
lot crockery_________________ 2
stillard and smothing irons______ 2.50
2 wheels 3 chairs & tables________ 7.50
700 lbs seed cotton_____________ 17.50
3 beds 2 bed steads and a bunk___ 55
2 old glases__________________ ???
1 set of old plow gears (?)_____ 50
Total 393.12
We certify the above memorandum to be a just and true appraisement of the goods and chat tels of Ambrose Pellum deceased as was shown to us by Lydia Pellum administratrix this 5th day of March 1802. L M Ayers Henry McMillan Azariah Richardson"
Change Date: 12 JUL 2002 at 10:13:50
Father: William PELHAM b: Abt 1730 in Orange County,Virginia
Mother: UNKNOWN
Marriage 1 Lydia KIRKLAND b: 1770
Children Humphrey H. PELHAM b: 20 AUG 1789 in Barnwell County,South Carolina
Richard PELHAM b: 1788 in Beaufort County,South Carolina
Ambrose PELHAM b: 1790 in South Carolina
Mary Eliza PELHAM b: 1793 in Barnwell County,South Carolina
Catherine PELHAM b: 1794 in Barnwell County,South Carolina
Uriah Middleton PELHAM b: 23 SEP 1795 in Barnwell County,South Carolina
Susanna PELHAM b: 1797
John William PELHAM b: 11 JAN 1799 in Barnwell County,South Carolina
Marriage 2 Penelope MCMILLAN
Married: Bef 1786
Children
Mourning PELHAM b: 1786 
Pelham, Ambrose (I851)
 
63 American Civil War Soldiers
Name: George Gannon
Residence: Sullivan, Indiana
Enlistment Date: 24 Jul 1861
Side Served: Union
State Served: Indiana
Service Record: Enlisted as a Private on 24 July 1861. Enlisted in Company D, 21st Infantry Regiment Indiana on 24 Jul 1861. Transferred out of Company D, 21st Infantry Regiment Indiana on 1 Feb 1863. Transferred into Company D, 1st Heavy Artillery Regiment Indiana on 1 Feb 1863. Mustered Out Company D, 1st Heavy Artillery Regiment Indiana on 13 Jan 1866.
Source Information:
Historical Data Systems, comp.. American Civil War Soldiers [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 1999. Original data: Data compiled by Historical Data Systems of Kingston, MA form the following list of works.
Copyright 1997-2000
Historical Data Systems, Inc.
PO Box 35
Duxbury
American Civil War Regiments
REGIMENT: 21st Infantry Regiment Indiana
Date of Organization: 23 Jul 1861
Muster Date: 1 Feb 1863
Regiment State: Indiana
Regiment Type: Infantry
Regiment Number: 21st
Regimental Soldiers and History: List of Soldiers
Regimental History
Battles Fought
Fought on 9 May 1862.
Fought on 10 May 1862 at Louisiana.
Fought on 2 Aug 1862.
Fought on 5 Aug 1862 at Baton Rouge, LA.
Fought on 20 Oct 1862.
Fought on 23 Oct 1862 at Atchafalaya Bayou, LA.
Fought on 3 Nov 1862 at Bayou Teche, LA.
Source Information:
Historical Data Systems, comp.. American Civil War Regiments [database on- line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 1999. Original data: Data compiled by Historical Data Systems of Kingston, MA from the following list of works. Copyright 1997-2000
Historical Data Systems, Inc.
PO Box 35
Duxbury, MA 023. 
Gannon, George W (I2928)
 
64 ANDREW GEYER, farmer., P. O., Marits; is a native of Westmoreland Co., Pa., and was born April 15, 1810; is a son of Andrew and Betsey (Linder) Geyer, who were parents of eleven children. They emigrated to the West about the year 1820 and located in Muskingum Co., buying 160 acres of land, which was covered with heavy timber; here they settled and died. Andrew was married Feb. 11, 1832 to Miss Cass Linder, a daughter of James and Catharine (Geyer) Linder. Mrs. Geyer was born in Muskingum Co., and after their marriage they went to keeping house; their outfit was neither elaborate nor expensive, and Mr. Geyer remarked that he could have easily carried all of their outfit upon his back. They lived several years in their cabin home and were happy; they had a "Dutch oven," which served a double purpose of skillet and boiler. In 1836, they came to this township, where they purchased 160 acres, and their log cabin experiences continued for years afterwards; in 1869, they moved to their present place of abode. They have had eleven children born to them, but three are now left of the number-Rebecca, now Mrs. John Smith, of Marion Co.; Sarah, now Mrs. Matthew Smith; and Ruth, Mrs. David Sellers, of Gilead. Mr. Geyer has 186 acres of land. and is now partially retired; he is in poor health, has heart disease. Geyer, Andrew (I1486)
 
65 Asa served in Capt.John Franklin's Co., Fifth Regiment of Militia in state of CT 1782

Estate Settlement of Asa Bennett
Orphans Court June 2nd 1800
Present, Nathan Denison & Jefse Pell esqs Judges of sd Court
Isaac Bennet, a Minor above the age of fourteen years comes into Court & prays to have John Carey appointed his Guardian, where upon the Court approve his choice & make the appointment accordingly---
Rhoda Bennet also a Minor above the age of fourteen years prays the Court to appoint Isaac Decker her Guardian whereupon the Court approve her choice and make the appointment accordingly.
Orphans Court March 16th 1801
Present Mathias Hollenback & Jefse Tell Esquires Judges of said Court.
Petition for partition of the Estate of Asa Bennet Decd.
The Petition of Wilber Bennet, Robert Bennet, Isaac Decker, Guardian of Rhoda Bennet, & John Cary Guardian of Isaac Bennet, heirs of Asa Bennet decd. was read setting forth that the said Asa Bennet died Intestate, seized & ppfsefsed of one Lot of Land in the Township of Wilkesbarre, being back (?) Lot number Twenty three, containing about Two hundred & Eighty acres, and part of Back Lot number Twenty four in said Township, containing about Two hundred & forth acres, leaving a widow, Lydia, and six children, to wit, Wilber,Polly (who is intermarried with Andrew Wickizer) Robert, Rosanna (since intermarried with John Shaver), Rhoda and Isaac, upon who the Estate has descended & become vested and being desirous of enjoying their respective shares in security (?) pray the Court to order partition thereof according to Law. ---Whereupon the Court after consideration by and with consent of the heirs, appoint Nathan Walker, David Richards, Samuel Peas, Aziel Dana, Elisha Blackman, Daniel Downing and Timothy Beebe to make partition of said Estate according to Law and report their doings herein at a futre _______ Court.
Valuation of the Real Estate of Asa Bennet decd
(Order dated March 16, 1801)
To the Honorable the Judges of the Orphans Court of the County of Luzerne...
We the subscribers appointed by the above order of the Court to make Partition of the Real Estaate therein mentioned, wherein the above named Asa Bennet died seised, Do Report that in pursuance of the said order, we have viewed the Lands, and Premises therein mentioned, and finding that the same cannot be divided to and among the parties above mentioned, without prejudice to, and spoiling the whole, have valued, and appraised the same at the sum of fourteen hundred, and sixty dollars.
Witnes our Hands, the twenty third day of November in the year of our Lord One thousand and eight hundred, and one.
/s/ Nathan Waller, Timothy Beebe, Daniel Downing, Aziel Dana, David Richards, Elisha Blackman, Lemuel Peas.
Which evaluation was confirmed by the Court. Wilber Bennet and Robert Bennet the two Eldest sons of the deceased verbally prayed that the Real Estate might be set.
The Account of Wilber Bennet, and Robert Bennet, Administrators of the Estate of Asa Bennet deceased, was presented, certified by the Register, wherein the Accountants charge themselves with $1172.08, and pray for allowance of their disburrsements 163.36 Leaving a ballance in the hands of the administrators 1008.72. Which said account was Investigated by the Court, and Ordered to be Pafsed. 
Bennett, Asa (I680)
 
66 Baird's History of Clark County 1909 page 683
Charles Edwin McKinley is a well known member of the Indiana branch of the illustrious McKinley family, and a relation of our martyred President of that name. In common with the other members of his family he boasts a Scotch-Irish line of ancestry, in which the Scotch strain predominated. The family was of Scotch Covenanter origin and as the descendants of sturdy and religious men the family history in this country has upheld its ancient traditions. He is a business man of acknowledged ability and as a citizen he has not gone without recognition.
Charles Edwin McKinley was born at Pleasant Ridge, Wood Township, four and a half miles south of Borden, in the vicinity of the old burial ground, on May 7, 1862. He was the son of William McKinley, and his wife, whose maiden name was Nancy Bell. Our subject's grandfather, Thomas McKinley, was a son of the head of the Indiana branch of the McKinley family.
Charles Edwin was educated in the public schools of Wood Township and on arrival at the proper age began life as a farmer. For eighteen years he farmed and marketed farm and dairy produce and had a large array of private customers in New Albany. In this line he was very successful and he still retains his farm at Pleasant Ridge. In October, 1906, he established himself as head of the well known McKinley Hotel at Borden, which was started some years before by Edwin McKinley. He also opened an adjoining store and carried on a general mercantile business. At the present time [1909] he conducts the McKinley Hotel, a livery stable, and a general store, on an extensive scale and in a first class manner. In addition he has been since 1907 president of the Borden State Bank.
Mr. McKinley married on the 17th of September, 1885, Jemima E. Bell, the daughter of well known townsfolk. Their marriage proved very happy and they have reared a family of four sons and four daughters, namely: Francis M., Sarah F. (known to her friends as Fannie); Jessie E., John H., Clarence D., Georgia E., Harry Goebel and Iva Mildred McKinley. All are well educated and accomplished.
Our subject was a member of a family composed of one girl and ten boys. In politics he is a Democrat. He is reckoned as one of the leading men of his party in Clark County. He was Trustee of Wood Township from 1895 to 1900. 
McKinley, Charles Edwin (I1960)
 
67 Baird's History of Clark County 1909 pages 545 - 546
The name of McKinley has of late years assumed something of a historic significance in this land of ours for it is linked in the public memory with the remembrance of a martyred President. It is but fitting that this should be so. And yet the family name and traditions go back beyond that towering figure of recent years, across the Atlantic and across the centuries, to find an ancestor of distinction and merit. The first to emerge out of the twilight of tradition with a definite record is the figure of a Scotch Covenanter, who, when the vicissitudes of the times made it necessary for him, went from his native land across to Ireland; thence in after years to the United States. Two of his sons, David and James McKinley, settled in Shelby County, Kentucky, and came in after years to the spot in Clark County, Indiana, where Borden now stands. David shortly after went northward to South Bend, and thence to Canton, Ohio, while James remained and made Wood Township his future home. David McKinley, as may be surmised, was the great-grandfather of President McKinley. James McKinley reared six sons: James, John, Thomas, William, Jeremiah and Alexander. The first named son, James, was the father of the subject of our sketch [Samuel McKinley]. James married Jincy Packwood, a native of Virigina, the daughter of Samuel Packwood. Samuel McKinley had eleven children, of whom nine are yet living. They are: Edward, Fred, Charles and Albert McKinley, and Mrs. Kate Minton, Mrs. Blanch Bell, Mrs. Lillie Bere, Mrs. Nettie Byerly, and Julia McKinley, all living in Borden with the exception of the three married sisters. Mrs. Kate Minton lives in Georgetown, Floyd County; Mrs. Blanche Bell lives in Jeffersonville, and the other married sisters in Louisville.
The McKinley Clan, 1763-1999 Compiled by the Borden Historical Society, Section I and The Bells of Pleasant Ridge 1760 - 2000 by Paul & Pat Coffman, page 15





History of the McKinley's, By Malinda (McKinley) Kelly, As Given to her granddaughter Bertha (Kelly) McKinley
James McKinley I and William McKinley, brothers, of Scotch-Irish decent, came from Omagh, in County Tyrone. Ulster Ireland, as British soldiers to fight in the American Revolution. They came down to Valley Forge, and when they saw the American soldiers fighting, barefooted and ragged, they decided the American cause must be right or they couldn't fight so bravely that way. They secretly made it up, among themselves, to flee the British and go over to the Americans.
When they were sent to the spring to get water, they filled their buckets and set them down, and fled toward the American camp, with their hands up, and gave themselves over to fight for the American cause. When the war was over, they came through Valley Forge, James I went to Kentucky and we think William went into Ohio and was the ancestor of President William McKinley. Ten of our presidents' ancestors came from Omagh, Ireland.
James McKinley met Jemima Kendall in Kentucky, and they were married in Jefferson County Kentucky on January 18, 1789. In the early eighteen hundreds, they came from Kentucky to Indiana and settled on the knob's south of Borden called Pleasant Ridge. There they lived until their death, and are buried in the Old McKinley-Packwood cemetery at the top of Pleasant Ridge Knob.
James McKinley I was killed by a fall from a spirited horse. His head struck a white oak root, breaking his neck, in 1830. The children of James McKinley I and Jemina (Kendall) McKinley were; John, Thomas, Nancy, lsabell, James II, Elizabeth, Jeremiah, Alexander, Jemima, William, Mary and two infants that died. 
McKinley, James (I2374)
 
68 Cause of Death, died after an operation for a tumor Coulter, Estella Mary (I377)
 
69 CRAWFORD COUNTY HISTORY OF CRAWFORD COUNTY AND OHIO BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES, Part III, p.725 CHICAGO BASKIN & BATTEY, HISTORICAL PUBLISHERS 186 DEARBORN STREET 1881 BUCYRUS TOWNSHIP, CRAWFORD COUNTY, OHIO
JONATHAN CARMEAN. farmer: P. O. Bucyrus ; son of Maj. Matthew and Rachel (Long) Carmean ; was horn Dec. 6, 1834, in what is now Dallas Township. Crawford Co.. Ohio. Until he reached his majority, he remained on his father's farm. receiving, in the meantime. an average school education. For two years after becoming of age, he worked his father's farm. carefully saving his earnings. In December 1857 he was married to Miss Sarah J. Goodman of Ross Co.. Ohio. and by her had five children. all of whom are living. as follows Alonzo, Dilla, lrvin, Eva B. and Arizona. Mr. Carmean is sufficiently public minded to take a deep interest in the welfare and prosperity of his county. He is the present owner of 493 acres of fine farming and grazing land 69 acres of the latter being timber. Upon his farm are comfortable and commodious buildings. Since 1860. Mr. Carmean has dealt quite extensively in sheep, cattle and hogs. He at present owns and keeps on his farm 800 head of fine sheep. His property is so situated as to afford Mr. Carmean a handsome revenue. He is a staunch Republican politically and has been so since the organization of that party: is a member of Grange No. 705 in Bucyrus and Merits and has gained the respect and confidence of his follow-citizens.

United States Federal Census 1910 Bucyrus Twp - Crawford Co., OH Series T624 Roll 1163 Part 1 Page 54B
Jonathan is found living with his daughter Eva in 1910
Metzger Peter age 45 Farmer born in Germany both parents born in Germany wife Eva B age 46 born in OH both parents born in OH Father-in-law Carmean Johnathan age 75 born in OH both parents born in PA

Obtained from pilot.familysearch.org Ohio Deaths 1908-1953
Name: Johnithan Carmean
Titles:
Death date: 29 Jan 1912
Death place: Bucyrus, Crawford, Ohio
Birth date: 06 Dec 1834
Estimated birth year:
Birth place: Ohio
Age at death: 77 years 1 month 23 days
Gender: Male
Marital status: Widowed
Race or color: Caucasian
Street address:
Occupation: Farmer
Residence:
Burial date: 31 Jan 1912
Burial place:
Cemetery name: Oakwood
Spouse name:
Father name: Mathew G. Carmean
Father titles:
Father birth place: Ohio
Mother name: Rachel Long
Mother titles:
Mother birth place: New Jersey
GSU film number: 1953095
Digital GS number: 4031994
Image number: 1044
Reference number: fn 834
Collection: Ohio Deaths 1908-1953 
Carmean, Jonathan D (I522)
 
70 DAVID J. PILLER
WEST READING, Pa. - David J. Piller, 53, of Reading, Pa., passed away Friday, May 9, 2008, at Nags Head, N.C., where he was away on a fishing trip.
He was born Nov. 7, 1954, in Cleveland.
He was a member of Lincoln Park United Methodist Church.
David served in the U.S. Navy during the Vietnam War.
He was employed by Exelon Corporation, Kennett Square, for 13 years as an environmental specialist.
Survivors include his wife, Carol R. (Halter) Piller; daughter, Corina R Piller, at home; brother, Stephen F. Piller of Toledo, Ohio; parents, Francis J. and Jean Louise (Stohlman) Piller of Lady Lake, Fla.; mother-in-law, Norma Halter, Vincennes.
Services were held on May 14 at Lincoln Park United Methodist Church.
In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to the Endowment Fund at Lincoln Park United Methodist Church at 1 Carlisle Ave., Reading PA 19609.
Online condolences may be made at www.kuhnfuneralhome.com
SOurce: Vincennes Sun Commercial Online http://www.suncommercial.com 
Pillar, Dave (I90)
 
71 Death Certificate obtained from pilot.familysearch.org Texas Deaths 1890-1976
Name: David Jackson Strickland
Death date: 06 May 1930
Death place: Pineland, Sabine, Texas
Gender: Male
Race or color (on document): white
Age at death: 67 years 6 months 24 days
Estimated birth year:
Birth date: 13 Oct 1862
Birth place: Barber Co., Ala.
Marital status: Married
Spouse name:
Father name: D.J. Strickland
Father birth place: Ala.
Mother name:
Mother birth place: Ala.
Occupation: Farmer
Residence:
Cemetery name:
Burial place: Beaumont
Burial date: 08 May 1930
Additional relatives:
Film number: 2135325
Digital GS number: 4163780
Image number: 2025
Reference number: 25928
Collection: Texas Deaths, 1890-1976 
Strickland, David Jackson (I995)
 
72 Died at the age of 2 Lemons, Eliza Iona (I107)
 
73 Ellsworth is found in the Social Security Death Index as follows: Name: Ellsworth McKinley SSN: 276-07-5328 Last Residence: 43215 Columbus, Franklin, Ohio, United States of America Born: 7 Aug 1910 Died: Apr 1985 State (Year) SSN issued: Ohio (Before 1951)
Ohio Deaths, 1908-1932, 1938-1944, and 1958-2002
Name: Ellswor McKinley
Birth Date: Est. 1911
Birth State: Indiana
Birth Country: United States

Gender: Male
Race: White

Residence City: Columbus
Residence County: Franklin
Residence State: Ohio
Residence Country: United States

Death Date: 16 Apr 1985
Hospital of Death: Home
City of Death: Columbus (Pt)
County of Death: Franklin
Certificate: 028014
Age at Death: 74
Certifier: Physician
Autopsy: Yes, used for certification

Social Security Number: 276-07-5328
Marital Status: Widowed
Industry of Decedent: Shoe stores
Occupation of Decedent: Supervisors and proprietors, sales occupations

Census Tract: 3900
Source Citation: Certificate: 028014; Volume: 26015
Source Information:
Ancestry.com and Ohio Department of Health. Ohio Deaths, 1908-1932, 1938-1944, and 1958-2002 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2006. Original data:
Ohio. Division of Vital Statistics. Death Certificates and index, December 20, 1908- December 31, 1953. State Archives Series 3094. Ohio Historical Society, Ohio.
Ohio Department of Health. Index to Annual Deaths, 1958-2002. Ohio Department of Health, State Vital Statistics Unit, Columbus, OH, USA. 
McKinley, Louis Ellsworth (I57)
 
74 Feb. 1, 1900 Thursday Sullivan Democrat
- Death of Mary J. Wolfe A Pioneer of Sullivan County Passes Away. Something of her History. - Mary J. (McKinley) Wolfe was born in Sullivan county on a farm near where the "Palmer's Prairie Meeting" house now stands, on 12th Nov. 1820. Daughter of David and Elizabeth (Russell) McKinley, early pioneers of the county, and was one of a family of nine children, only two of whom survive: Sarah A. Land and James R. McKinley. The latter long a resident and well known in this community.
When about 18 years old she joined the Christian church at Palmer's Prairie under ministry of Albert P. Law and was baptized by Elder Palmer, from whom the local congregation took its name.
On the 16th of Oct. 184- She was married to Jos. W. Wolfe, and went with him to his home " Shaker's Prairie." Her husband being a widower with four small children, she at once assumed the cares and responsibilities of the household, and this was her highest ambition through out her long after-life, that she should occupy the position and reign Queen of the home. At this time, and for several years after, her husband was engaged in farming, and gave all of his spare time to evangelistic work in western Indiana and Illinois, which kept him away from home much of his time, and left to her not only the cares of the household, but the farm as well.
In 1850 her husband having been elected Clerk of the Circuit Court, the family moved to Sullivan. This was a _____ circumstances, but ____ her life work.
The seeds of (this paragraph omitted, copy too faded to read.)
While those of her own household received her special care, she did not forget to entertain strangers, especially those who, with her husband, were engaged in the ministry. So common was this that her house was known as the "Preacher's Home."
Many of the pioneers, such as Law, Fields, Combs, Trimble, Goodman and others of lesser or greater note were entertained by her. Alexander Campbell, witnessing the anxiety she manifested in entertaining him, gently chided her by proposing to change her name from Mary to Martha because she was "cumbered a wont with much serving."
Her husband, who had more than a state reputation as one of the pioneer preachers for "the restoration", died in January, 1887, since which time the deceased made her home with her grand-daughter, Mrs. J. B. Mullane, and "the bread she had cast upon the water" she was permitted to gather up after many days, for the one over whom she had watched and who she had cared for in infancy now cared for her in old age and in second childhood.
Thus a life of almost four score years of loving service; over half a century in her Master's vineyard, the body worn out, the mind living only in the past; the memory only bringing her again the scenes of her childhood, was brought to a close at 1 o'clock, p.m., Monday January 29th.
The funeral services occurred Wednesday afternoon at 1:30, conducted by Elder Yocum of the Christian church. Interred Center Ridge cemetery. 
McKinley, Mary J (I1516)
 
75 Florida State Census 1935 Bay County Precinct 11 Lynn Haven
John Odom age 29 Wife Johny Lee age 28 son James age 10 son Henry age 9 daughter Eula Mae age 6 daughter Isabelle age 4 daughter Lena (Lona?) Belle age 9 mos. 
Family F324
 
76 Fond Memories Of the LIFE OF EDITH MILAM KLOER
Written 1975 - 1981 From : Mary Jo (Milam) Brixey (Descendant) brixey@direcway.com
Another fond memory is the fun we had around the old pond that was close by the old log house. We had a boat there and when we were old enough we each in turn learned how to row the boat and fish. Curlus was our lifeguard and did a good job of watching over us. I remember one time that I fell backward out of the boat. I think I would never have come up but Curlus jumped right in after me and he soon had me back in the boat. There was a sand bar at one end of the pond where we waded. Nobody had bathing suits, we just used some kind of old clothing, what ever was available.
The pond was well stocked with fish, too. We seemed to get a new supply each year. During the rainy season when the river was overflowing its banks, there was an inlet into the little pond (part of the way it was only a ditch) but we seemed to get a fresh supply of fish every year. They were mostly carp and catfish, also we had a few perch and sunfish, sometimes there were also turtles and snakes. I remember one time when Kathryn caught a turtle on her hook. One day Kathryn and I were fishing alone and somehow she got the hook caught in the thick part of her thumb. We could not get it out alone and Mother happened to be gone that day, but we knew where Dad was plowing in the field, so we walked there, carrying the pole and line. He saw us coming and knew something was wrong, so he came to meet us and soon had the hook out of her hand. Seems as if we did not worry about the little accidents and trouble along the way, we just accepted it as a way of life.
This story was given to me by my brother Henry: There was a farmer with a large family living in Grandpa's community, who had stored his winter meat supply but one night a pack of wolves broke in and stole all of his meat. There was nothing left. He really was in great difficulty as he had counted on his winter supply and had taken the rest to market.
On the following Sunday night our Grandpa stood up in church and told this story to the congregation and added: "This man needs help and I will start by donating him one pig." There was a colored man in the congregation who also lived in the neighborhood who stood up and said "I will donate two pigs." This continued until practically every family there had donated something. Then they set the following Saturday and each came to this man's house, bringing his donation, and helped butcher the animals and put the meat away. This man ended up with more meat than he had in the beginning. Farmers were real neighbors in those days.
My Dad did a pretty good job of being a good neighbor, too. He had taken a veterinarian course by mail and did pretty well treating the sick animals. The neighbors depended on him when they had a sick animal. They would even get him out of bed at night for a sick horse or whatever. He never refused to go. He was also a pretty good barber and on Sundays he was usually doing free haircuts. Another one of his hobbies was cleaning and oiling clocks and watches or doing small repairs on them.
He always had several ahead waiting for him to find time to service them. Mother used to get worried with him working so much for the neighbors when he would be behind with his own work. He could just not say "No" to a neighbor. Life was so much simpler then. I wish we could have kept the farm so the younger ones of our family would have had the privilege of growing up there, and would also have all of these memories.
This is a story Hud tells of Grandpa Milam and the gold rush of 1849. Our Dad had heard a lifetime of stories of how Grandpa Milam dug gold in California. Hud said that when Dad and Mother visited them in California in 1955, Dad was very interested in seeing where Grandpa had dug his gold. The only description Dad had of the site was that it was in a canyon and there was a river flowing out of the mountain there.
Hud and Mary Ellen were interested in gemstones and had traveled over most of southern California deserts in a jeep looking for them. He knew of a place, Afton Canyon, about 20 miles southwest of Baker, California, where the river flows out of the mountain. He took Dad to that spot and Dad was satisfied that this was the place where Grandpa had dug gold. Dad was 81 on that trip.
Hud says that it is not at all likely that Grandpa dug gold at that spot, as there had been very little gold mining in that area, and he thinks from the stories he has heard that Grandpa was in the mother-lode country, about 3 or 4 hundred miles north of the Baker
site. With Hud's interest in mining he had subscribed to several mining magazines, including one put out by the California Bureau of Mines. They have a record of all the gold mine claims ever filed in California. He has checked these records carefully and did not find where Grandpa ever filed a claim. He said the old miners and mining papers say that sometimes a miner sold of his claim; then maybe the buyer would sell ± of that claim; then maybe the next buyer would sell of his claim, until sometimes the area worked would be as small as 10'x12'. All fractions of claims were held by a bill of sale that could be traced to a claim. Some claims were taken and held by force only. It is possible that Grandpa has a claim that was not recorded.
Hud would prefer to believe that he made his money here as a teamster, a job at which he excelled. At one time Grandpa hauled freight from Vincennes to Terre Haute up the oldest trail in Indiana, called "Buffalo Trace". Henry seems to think Grandpa Milam made most of his money buying virgin land, clearing it, and selling it at a high profit. Hud thinks he made it hauling freight. Grandpa was a very wealthy man for those days.
Hud says that some of those gold mines were in very rough terrain, places where is very hard to walk to get into them. Yet in spite of the rugged terrain they would have heavy equipment and a lot of building material there. It would take the best of teamsters to move that material in, and he says that he has been told that Grandpa was the best. He used what was called a "string team", maybe six or eight teams in a line. All of them were controlled by one line, called a "jerk line" or a "snap line." Grandpa came west on a wagon train out of St. Louis. They took what was called the northern route to San Francisco. He doesn't remember the name of the wagon master. That was a six months trip. He came home by taking a steamship out of Los Angeles to Panama, and crossed Panama by mule train (before the canal). He took another steamer to New Orleans, and a riverboat to Evansville, Indiana, and from there overland to his home. I remember Aunt Bonnie told me that Grandpa was the bookkeeper for the bunch going out. He bought the supplies and kept account of the money spent and what each one had paid in. 
Milam, Charles Henry (I264)
 
77 Fond Memories Of the LIFE OF EDITH MILAM KLOER
Written 1975 - 1981 From : Mary Jo (Milam) Brixey (Descendant) brixey@direcway.com
This part will be about the war years. World War I. We were all heartbroken when our big brother had to go to war, but I think my Dad took it harder than anybody. I remember he would say "Our family circle is broken - he is the first to go - the first to break our family circle." My Mother was always the calm and courageous one. She would say "He will be back and besides he is still ours wherever he goes."
He was sent to France real quick and was assigned as a mechanic in the Army Air Corps. The airplane was really in its infancy at that time. Curlus was so enthralled with the wonders of the airplane and the great potential of such a wonderful invention. He was gone about a year I think, and we thought he would have wonderful things to tell us about France. But he just said, "The most beautiful thing I saw in all of France was the ship that brought me home."
We were all aghast when he started talking of re-enlisting but he wanted so much to learn to fly and he said he would not have an opportunity for flying lessons otherwise, so he was not home very long until he was gone again. But he was gone only about 2 months and back home heart-sick with disappointment. He had washed out of the Air Corps on account of astigmatism in his eyes. He could not make a proper landing with this handicap. In these days of modern flying with instruments, that would probably not be much of a handicap, but at that time he did not have the modern flying instruments. We were all happy to have him back. All he could say was "How can you be so happy about me being home, this is the worst disappointment of my whole life."
During his high school days he had been an outstanding boxer, but he evidently has a bad experience with boxing while he was in the Army. He would never tell us anything about what happened, but he would never box again. He would not even talk about it.
As Becky and Jo asked especially about information regarding Curlus and Imo I will keep talking about them. I first knew Imo when we all attended the Church of Christ on East Jackson St., in Sullivan. She and her sister Esther usually came to church together and Kathryn and I would be together. We admired them very much but we would just speak and say something friendly yet neither of us made any effort to get better acquainted. I think Imo and Curlus did not start dating until after he came back from the service. I could be wrong about that, but that is the way I remember it. He had a real crush on her from the very beginning and Kathryn and I liked to tease him, as he always had something to tease us about. Imo had a beautiful red coat with a white fur collar and Curlus thought she looked gorgeous in it. He said"Her big dark eyes are even more beautiful against that white fur." Kathryn and I told him we thought she looked like Santa Claus in that coat, but of course we were teasing. We really thought Imo always looked nice whatever she was wearing.
After Curlus came back from the service he had trouble finding a job, as did several hundred other boys. He taught school one year before he went to service and taught 6 weeks in the second year before he was called to go. They decided to get married anyway, so they found a small furnished apartment which was their first home. They spent their honeymoon on a camping trip down around the old pond where we used to live. Imo was not at all impressed, but Curlus like the rest of us had such fond memories of that old pond that it was a perfect setting for him and his new happiness. Imy came within the next year which added to their expenses but she was such a doll, she received a royal welcome from all of us. About that time Curlus started working for the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company.
He was selling insurance and making collections for them. During a routine physical checkup for additional insurance they discovered Curlus had a spot on his lung and they sent him to their New York sanitarium for further tests and treatment. This was a real bad time for that, as Imo was now expecting her second baby and her delivery date was near. In fact, Josephine arrived while her Daddy was still in New York. Imo had a real bad time with the delivery and they finally had to do a caesarian birth. Mother was with Imo when Jo arrived but she always felt that Jo had some brain damage at birth, because they waited so long before they did the operation. We all went crazy over Jo as she was the first brown-eyed baby we had ever had in our family, although Jo's great- grandmother, the one she was named for, had brown eyes. So we had two Josephine Georgeanne Milams in the family.
I seems as if Imo and I never did have a very close relationship, a real understanding. I always felt she was a little bit jealous of me, as Curlus and I were real pals. Looking back now I wonder if she did not feel the same about me, that I was jealous of giving up my brother. I did miss him a lot but I really wanted him to be happy and I did feel that he and Imo were really meant for each other. The last time I came to visit Imo was when she was so sick, but we really got everything ironed out between us. She seemed so glad I came and I was so glad to be there. We laid aside all the differences of the past and let our love show through. I left there feeling I had been greatly blessed and hoping she felt the same way, She faced her illness with such courage, I had the greatest admiration for her, also for my brother who cared for her so lovingly. She died of cancer of the uterus. 
Milam, Curlus Richard (I272)
 
78 FREDERICK GLATHART, farmer; P. O., Caledonia; was born Dec. 19, 1827, in Canton Baron, Switzerland, and is the second child of Christian and Ann (Gacht) Glathart, who emigrated to this State in 1829, locating in Starr Co., Ohio, where he purchased land. Frederick came to this county with his parents, when he was but 8 years of age; his father entered forty acres of land on Section 17, and for several years lived a pioneer life. At the age of 21, he began work for himself; worked two years by the month. In the spring of 1852, he made a trip to California, going the overland route, and spent two years near Marysville, on Feather River, at work on a farm, and one year in the mines. Upon his return in 1855, he purchased eighty acres, where he now lives, and has since been engaged in farming. April 11, 1861, he was married to Margaret Baird, who was born in this township, Oct. 30, 1842, and was a daughter of Peter and Nancy Bockoven, who were natives of New Jersey; they have had five children born to them, but three are living-Nancy Ann, born Jan. 18,1866; Rebecca E., July 10, 1868; Gertrude, April 9, 1875. Notwithstanding his unfavorable start, he now has 220 acres of good land. His father died in 1853; his mother, March 8, 1874.

Information obtained from pilot.familysearch.org Ohio Deaths 1908-1953
Name: Frederick Glathart
Titles:
Death date: 01 Jul 1916
Death place: Canaan Twp, Morrow, Ohio
Birth date: 19 Dec 1827
Estimated birth year:
Birth place: Switzerland
Age at death: 88 years 6 months 11 days
Gender: Male
Marital status:
Race or color: American
Street address:
Occupation:
Residence:
Burial date:
Burial place:
Cemetery name:
Spouse name:
Father name: Christian Glathart
Father titles:
Father birth place:
Mother name: Ann Gaht
Mother titles:
Mother birth place:
GSU film number: 1983754
Digital GS number: 4096403
Image number: 1591
Reference number: fn 53262
Collection: Ohio Deaths 1908-1953 
Glathart, Frederick (I2296)
 
79 From Familysearch.com

Groom's name: Amos Green
Groom's race or color: Caucasian
Groom's birthdate:
Groom's birthplace: Jennings Indiana
Groom's residence: Haddon Twp
Groom's number of marriages: Once
Groom's father's name: John Green
Groom's mother's name: Meeks
Bride's name: Mary Mckinley
Bride's race or color: Caucasian
Bride's birthdate:
Bride's birthplace: Haddon Twp
Bride's residence: Haddon Twp
Bride's number of marriages: once
Father of bride's name: Jno Mckinley
Mother of bride's name: Mcclanahan
Informant's name:
Marriage license date:
Marriage county: Sullivan
Marriage date: 05 Oct 1882
Marriage place: , Sullivan,
Official's name:
Record number: 131
Film number: 1401739
Digital GS number: 4170579
Image number: 00131
Number of images: 1
Collection: Indiana Marriages 1811-1959 
Family F42
 
80 From MayflowerHistory.com
Francis Cooke was born about 1583. His origins have not been discovered, but it is probable he was born in England, perhaps from the Canterbury or Norwich areas. He married Hester le Mahieu on 20 July 1603 in Leiden, Holland; she was a French Walloon whose parents had initially fled to Canterbury, England; she left for Leiden sometime before 1603. Francis Cooke and Hester le Mahieu's marriage occurred in Leiden, Holland six years before the Pilgrim church made its move there, so he was living there long before their arrival and must have met up with and joined them afterwards. His wife Hester was a French Walloon. What brought Francis to Holland in the first place is unknown: religious persecution of Protestants in England did not really begin until after King James took power in 1604. In 1606, the Cookes left Leiden and went to Norwich, Norfolk for a time (for what reason is not known), but returned to have their first son, John, baptized at the French church in Leiden, sometime between January and March, 1607. In Holland, Cooke took up the profession of a woolcomber.
Francis, and his oldest son John, came on the Mayflower to Plymouth in 1620. He left behind his wife Hester and his other children Jane, Jacob, Elizabeth and Hester. After the Colony was founded and better established, he sent for his wife and children, and they came to Plymouth in 1623 on the ship Anne.
Francis lived out his life in Plymouth. Although he kept a fairly low profile, he was on a number of minor committees such as the committee to lay out the highways, and received some minor appointments by the Court to survey or lay out land. He was a juror on a number of occasions, and was on the coroner's jury that examined the body of Martha Bishop, the 4-year old daughter who was murdered by her mother Alice. He received some modest land grants at various times throughout his life. He lived to be about 80 years old, dying in 1663; his wife Hester survived him by at least three years and perhaps longer.

From MayflowerHistory.com
Will of Francis Cooke
7 December 1659
The last Will and Testament of francis Cooke of Plymouth late Deceased: exhibited before the Court held att Plymouth aforsaid the fift day of June 1663 on the oathes of mr John Aldin and mr John howland;
The Last Will and Testament of ffrancis Cooke made this seaventh of the tenth month 1659
I being att prsent weake and Infeirme in body yett in prfect memory throw mercy Doe comitt my soule unto god that gave it and my body to the earthe; which my will is should bee Intered in a Decent and comly manner;
As for such goods and lands as I stand posessed of I Doe will and bequeath as followeth;
1 My will is that hester my Dear and loveing wife shall have all my moveable goods and all my Cattle of all kinds; viz: neat Cattle horsekind sheep and swine to be att her Dispose
2 my will is that hester my wife shall have and Injoy my lands both upland and meddow lands which att prsent I posesse During her life
3 I Doe ordaine and appoint my Deare wife and my son John Cooke Joynt exequitors of this my said will
Witnes
John Aldin
ffrancis Cooke
John howland 
Cooke, Francis (I1776)
 
81 From MayflowerHistory.com
John Cooke was born in late 1606 or early 1607, and was baptized at the French Walloon church in Leiden, Holland between January and March, 1607.
John spent his early years in Leiden, Holland, and came with his father on the Mayflower in 1620 at the age of about 13 or 14. John was then raised in Plymouth; his mother and sisters came over on the ship Anne in 1623, along with his future wife Sarah Warren. He would marry Sarah, the daughter of Mayflower passenger Richard Warren, in 1634 at Plymouth. They would go on to have five children all born in Plymouth over the next twenty years. John would become a deacon in the Plymouth Church, and in 1636, Samuel Eaton (who was still breast-feeding when he came on the Mayflower) was apprenticed to him.
At some point, during the late 1640s, John Cooke "fell into the error of Anabaptistry", and was cast out of the Church. The Plymouth Church records state that "This John Cooke although a shallow man became a cause of trouble and dissention in our Church and gave just occasion of their casting him out; so that Solomon's words proved true in him that one sinner destroyeth much good."
John Cooke removed from Plymouth and took up residence in Dartmouth, where he died in 1695. His wife Sarah was still alive in 1696, called "a very ancient woman"; her exact death date was not recorded but it probably was not long after.

From MayflowerHistory.com
Will of John Cooke
9 November 1694
The Last will and Testament of John Cook of the town of Dartmouth in the County of Bristoll:
I being weake of Body but of sound and Perfect memory, have Disposed of my Estate which God hath been pleased to bestow upon me in manner following: that is to say In the first place I give to my Son in-law Arthur Hathaway & his wife Sarah my Daughter all my land in the point at or Near the Burying place in Dartmouth the which I bought of John Russell to them their heires and Assignes for Ever: And also I give unto my Son in-law Stephen west and his wife Mercey my Daughter one full Third part of a whole Share of lands in the Township of Dartmouth with all my houseing and Orchards "hereunto belonging: with all the priviledges & appur=ces belonging to the same to them their heires & Assignes for ever They to possess the same after the Decease of my wife Sarah Allso I give unto Jonathan Delano. one Third part of a share of meadow Caled the ffreemens Meadow Lyeing within the Township of Rochester to him his heires & assigne for Ever: Allso I give to my Grandson Thomas Taber my little Island Caled & Known by the Name of Ram Island Lying in Cushnat River in Dartmouth with one third part of my Share of Meadow Called the ffreemens Meadow Lyeing in the Township of Rochester. to him his heires & assignee for Ever and I give to my said Grand son my Gun & sword Allso I give to my Grand Daughter Hester Perry One feather Bed & Bolster, All the Rest & Residue of Estate Goods & Chattles of what Sort or Kind so ever I Give & bequeath uto my Loveing wife Sarah to use. & Dispose of the same as she shall see good And I make my said wife Sole Executrix of this my Last will & Testament: In witness whereof I the said John Cooke have hereunto sett my hand & seale this Ninth Day of November 1694 in the presence of
Aaron Savory O his mark
John Cooke (seal) Thomas Taber
memorandum that on the 16th of Aprill 1696
Then appeared Aaron Savory & Thomas Taber both of Dartmouth, Before John Saffin Esqr Judge of Probate ot wills &ca and made Oath that they were present & did see John Cooke late of Dartmouth Decd Signe seale & publish this Instrument to be his last will & testiment and yt he was of a Disposeing mind when he so did to the best of their apprehensions
Jno Saffin John Cary Registr
Thus Entered & Engrosed may the: 8th 1696 By Jno Cary Registr
December the 7th 1696 A true Inventory of the Estate Goods & Chattels of John Cooke late of Dartmouth Deceased 
Cooke, John (I1032)
 
82 From website 37th Alabama Volunteers http://www.alabama37th.com/
Holland (sic Howland), Spenser R (B)
Private
Company A
POW at Corinth MS 3-5 Oct 1862 and forwarded to Columbus KY for exchange; Aboard steamer Dacotah for exchange 18 Oct 1862 and declared exchanged 8 Nov 1862; Captured/Paroled at Vicksburg (FIND RECORD); POW at Graysville GA on 27 Nov 63 and sent to Nashville, Louisville and on to Rock Island Prison IL; Enlisted 25 Jan 1864 in U.S. Navy at Camp Douglas IL to get out of prison - served duration of war aboard USS Circassian; Brother to Jesse Holland (Company A); Brother to John Holland (Company A); A "S W Holland" (possibly this man) is noted as having witnessed the Confederate Pension of W J Barnes (Company E) along with "Frank Jordan" (likely Francis Jordan also of Company A)
Name: Spencer Holland Side: Confederate Roll: M598_89 Roll Title: Selected Records of the War Department Relating to Confederate Prisoners of War, 1861-1865 
Holland, Spencer W (I1098)
 
83 GEORGE MCKINLEY DIES
March 23, 1910 Sullivan Daily Times
Six weeks after the burial of his wife, one of the best known farmers in this community, died of acute Bright's Disease Thursday.
He had been quite sick since before the death of his wife and the worry over her death hastened his death. He leaves three daughters and four sons, the youngest being 3 years old, left with no one except the sympathizing public to care for them. Clara, the six year old daughter, was taken to MO. by her uncle, Frank Milam.
He was buried at the Merom Cemetery Friday.

George & Lilly (Milam) McKinley are on the 1900 census in Sullivan County Indiana, Turman Twp. District 137. The family is listed as follows:
McKinley, George (Head of Household) Born Feb 1856 Age 44 married 9 years born in Indian Father born in Kentucky and mother born in Indiana Occupation Farmer
McKinley, Lilly (Wife) born March 1872 age 28 married 9 years born in Indiana and both parents born in Indiana
McKinley, Nancy C. (daughter) born Oct 1892 age 7 born in Indiana
McKinley, Mary G. (daughter) born Sept 1894 age 5 born in Indiana
McKinley, Hosie (Son) born Oct 1896 age 3 born in Indiana
McKinley, George W. (son) born Feb 1898 age 2 born in Indiana
McKinley, Jesse (son) born Jan 1900 age 4 months born in Indiana
1910 Census Sullivan County Gill Twp. District 167 It reads as follows:
McKinley, George W (Head) age 54 Occupation Farmer married 19 years born in Indiana, Father in KY and Mother in IN.
McKinley, Lilly B (probably a misprint) (Wife) age 38 married 19 years born in Indiana, both parents in Indiana
McKinley, Nancy C. (daughter) age 17 born in Indiana
McKinley, Mary G. daughter age 15 born in Indiana
McKinley, Hosie H (?) (son) age 14 born in Indiana
McKinley, George W. Jr. (son) age 12 born in Indiana
McKinley, Jesse B. (son) age 10 born in Indiana
McKinley, Clara A. (daughter) age 8 born in Indiana
McKinley, William F (?) (son) age 2 born in Indiana 
McKinley, George W (I1397)
 
84 Headstone reads as follows: "PATTERSON, Florence Odom, b. May 1 1846 d. Dec 21 1942, "Grand Daughters Who Care Hazel & Gussie"
She should have had Odom as her last name as she was married to Lewis Patterson first... she married second JWD Odom. My mother says her maiden name was Bruner.Also according to census records she was born about 1868. Her headstone indicates she was born 22 years earlier. If this is the case then there would have been 33 years difference in the age of Florence and her second husband JWD Odom. She would have been 55 years old at the birth of Ashley Odom 60 at the birth of John Odom and almost 70 at the birth of her daughter Blanche. I am inclined to believe that the birth year on her headstone is incorrect especially since her name is also placed on the stone incorrectly. 
Bruner, Laura Florence (I770)
 
85 Hinson, Nelson age 63 farmer has one leg born in NC both parents born in NC
wife Mary Ann age 60
Son Isaac age 20 Laborer born in AL
Branton, Wm R age 17 relationship not stated Laborer born in AL 
Family F1738
 
86 History of Crawford County - Dallas Twp.
Maj. Carmean is another of the heavy land-owners and stock-dealers, and is among the old settlers of Dallas. He in company with his brother "Jimmy," emigrated from Ross County, in the fall of1827, and entered a piece of land now included in the old Shank farm, in the western part of the township. After spending five years here, he bought of Benjamin Warner 400 acres and moved to his present homestead. He has accumulated wealth in his day by stock raising and dealing until he has no small pittance to enjoy in his ripening years. When a young man, he took a full course in veterinary surgery at Chillicothe, Ohio, in which profession he has for many years had more than a local reputation and name. Perhaps there is no present resident of Dallas so widely known in Crawford and adjoining counties as Mr. Carmean. Even at his advanced age he is not infrequently called great distances to give the diagnosis in critical cases of valuable horses, and is the local referee in all diseases in dispute among the younger veterinarians. His practical knowledge and skill in anatomy gained him, while yet a young man, a position in the Ohio Canal Company, where he practiced human surgery and medicine for the company several years. He was never an excessive sporter with his gun, and yet, in his younger days, few could equal him as a marks-man. He usually chose to ride on horseback in his deer hunts, which, from his frequent successful shots, was a great saving of his strength in bearing home the game. He received the title of Major from the position he held in one of the local military organizations of Marion County.
HISTORY of CRAWFORD COUNTY AND OH CHICAGO BASKIN & BATTEY, HISTORICAL PUBLISHERS, 186 DEARBORN STREET 1881
Dallas Twp. Pg 1024
MAJ M. G. CARMEAN, farmer ; P. O. Bucyrus; he was born in Ohio, Dec. 31, 1804; a son of John and Nancy (Grayless) Carmean, formerlyof Maryland. They emigrated to Ohio in the spring of 1804, and settled in Rock Co., where the subject of this sketch was raised, and where he married, Sept. 30, 1829, Miss Rachel Long, of Pennsylvania. The following children were born to them Mary A., wife of H. Coulter, of Marion Co.,Ohio; .Jonathan D., living in Bucyrus : Ellen E., Matthew L., married Miss Grolsbaugh, of Pennsylvania; Nelson died Aug. 17, 1851. Maj. Carmean was, for a number of years the Major of the Marion Co. State Guards. Has been noted throughout this county as a successful veterinary surgeon. He came to this county with no money, but a strong constitution and a will to work, and by economy and industry he has secured a competence, owning 900 acres of good land. Mr. and Mrs. Carmean are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mr. Carmean is a member of the A.. F. &, A. M. Has been honored by his neighbors by being elected Trustee for many years. He is a Republican.

Name: MATTHEW CARMEAN Land Office: TIFFIN Document Number: 4274 Total Acres: 80 Signature: Yes Canceled Document: No Issue Date: December 06, 1830 Metes and Bounds: No Statutory Reference: 3 Stat. 566 Multiple Warantee Names: No Act or Treaty: April 24, 1820 Multiple Patentee Names: No Entry Classification: Sale-Cash Entries Land Description: 1 E[1/2] SE 1ST PPM No 4 S 16 E 5
Source: United States. Bureau of Land Management. Ohio Land Records [database on-line] Provo, UT: Ancestry.com, 1997-. Original electronic data from: United States. Bureau of Land Management. Ohio Pre-1908 Homestead & Cash Entry Patent and Cadastral Survey Plat Index. General Land Office Automated Records Project, 1996. 
Carmean, Matthew J (I521)
 
87 HISTORY of CRAWFORD COUNTY AND OH CHICAGO BASKIN & BATTEY, HISTORICAL PUBLISHERS, 186 DEARBORN STREET 1881
Dallas Twp. Pg 1024
SAMUEL COULTER, farmer; P. O. Bucyrus; was born May 13, 1801, in Huntingdon Co., Penn., is a son of Samuel and Sarah (Bryce) Coulter, formerly of Pennsylvania: came to Ohio in 1832, and settled in what was then Marion Co., now Crawford, on the place he now owns; is the only one of the pioneers who still owns the first 40 acres that he entered of the Government. Was married, April 18, 1826, to Miss Sarah Keer, of Pennsylvania. Their children are John H., of Marion Co.; .James N., of Des Moines. Iowa ; William K., Macon Co., Ill. ; Sarah, wife of William Simmons, Esq. ; Margarete, wife of Thomas Price, of Marion; Martha, wife of William Keer, of Piatt Co., Ill. ; Samuel, now living at Holden, Mo. ; Mary, wife of John Hourer, of Marion Co.; George W., now living at home; Samuel and James were soldiers for three years during the war. Elizabeth, his sister, has been living with him for about twenty years since his wife died. He owns 200 acres of good land; is a member of the Presbyterian Church, and polled his first vote for Jackson, and has been a Democrat ever since.
DALLAS TWP HISTORY
One of the oldest men still living in this township is Samuel Coulter, who although a man of seventy-nine years of age, is still active, and recalls many incidents of early days with great accuracy. Mr. Coulter came from Huntingdon County, Penn., in 1832, and leased a strip of land of Mr. Van Horne. This land he afterward bought, and it is now cultivated by his youngest son, George. The elder Coulter built one of the first large barns of old Pennsylvania style. This well- constructed building was put up by Anthony Houser, and is still standing, a souvenir of early enterprise. Mr. Coulter was a grain farmer and bought out his neighbors, John and Daniel Reecer, and other lots of forty and eighty acres, until he is ranked as one of the prominent landlords of Dallas. His maiden sister, Miss Sarah Coulter, is the oldest person now living in Dallas, being in her eighty-fifth year. 
Coulter, Samuel (I489)
 
88 HISTORY OF GREENE AND SULLIVAN COUNTIES, STATE OF INDIANA, FROM THE EARLIEST TIME TO THE PRESENT; TOGETHER WITH INTERESTING BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES, REMINISCENCES, NOTES, ETC. CHICAGO: GOODSPEED BROS. & CO., PUBLISHERS. 1884.SULLIVAN CO., IN GILL TWP. PAGE 784
ANTHONY S. MASON is a native of Washington County, Ky., born April 10, 1808, being the fifth child of thirteen born to James and Rebecca (Sandusky) Mason, who came to this township at an early day. October 25, 1827, he married Mary M. Armstrong, and twelve children have been born, nine of whom are living--William T., who married Amanda Lynch; Mary Jane, who is the wife of Lewis Eaton; John W., who married Mary E. Knotts; Robert B., whose wife was Hattie Duncan; Rebecca S., wife of John Bruner; Samuel T., who married Matilda Davis; Thomas A., who married Laura Springer; Katharine, wife of Anthony S. Springer; and Richard R., whose wife was Nancy Dodds. Mr. and Mrs. Mason are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church at New Lebanon. The occupation of Mr. Mason has always been farming and raising stock, and he is looked upon as one of the best citizens of Gill Township. His politics is Republican. 
Mason, Anthony Sandusky (I1584)
 
89 HISTORY OF HANOVER TOWNSHIP AND WYOMING VALLEY
Luzerne County, Pennsylvania
By: Henry Blackman Plumb, 1885, 498 pp.
Robert Baur, Printer and Stationer, Wilkes-Barre, PA
Compiled By: James H. Culbert
THE JONATHAN WEEKS FAMILY
CONTAINED IN THE HANOVER GENEALOGICAL TABLES TO 1830,
pp. 484-485
Jonathan WEEKS, came from Fairfield, Connecticut to Wyoming with his wife, Abigail, and two sons, Jonathan and Philip, in 1762-63; escaped the massacre of 1763; Philip and Thomas, his sons, came to Wyoming in 1769 with the first two hundred in the second attempt to settle the land; the father, with Jonathan and Bartholomew and two daughters, came soon afterward; in the battle of 3 Jul 1778, seven persons went out from his house to the battle - Philip, Jonathan, and Bartholomew, his sons, Silas BENEDICT, who married his granddaughter, Jabez BEERS (probably the father of Philip's wife), Josiah CARMAN, another relative, and Robert BATES, a boarder; the whole seven lay dead on the fatal field that night. His children were:
Jonathan WEEKS, b. ?, m. ?, d. 1778, slain in the Massacre
Philip WEEKS, b. ?, d. 1778, killed in the Massacre, m. Abigail BEERS
Bartholomew WEEKS, b. ?, m. ?, d. 1778, slain in the Massacre
Thomas WEEKS, b. ?, d. ? [before 1885], lived in Wilkes-Barre in 1788
Two daughters, m. ?
Jonathan WEEKS 2 (Jonathan 1) was born in Connecticut; came to Wyoming first in 1762-63; and finally in 1769-70; resided in Wilkes-Barre; married ?; was slain in the massacre of 3 Jul 1778. They had (the family of Jonathan is uncertain):
John WEEKS
Jersuha WEEKS
Sarah WEEKS
Joseph WEEKS
Benjamin WEEKS
Philip WEEKS 2 (Jonathan 1) was born in Connecticut; came to Wyoming first in 1762-63; and finally in 1769 with the first two hundred settlers; resided in the lower part of Wilkes-Barre on or near the present STURDEVANT place; married Abigail BEERS; was killed in the Wyoming Massacre of 3 Jul 1778; being called back out of the river by the promises of the Indians to spare his life, but as soon as he got out of the water they fell upon him with spear and tomahawk and killed him at the water's edge; they knew him; his house was about a mile below their town of Maughwauwama on the elevated flats or terrace. They had:
Lydia WEEKS, m. Silas BENEDICT
Hulda WEEKS, m. Comfort CAREY
Philip WEEKS, b. 1774, d. ? [before 1885], m. (1st) Amelia DURKEE, m. (2nd) ? CAMPBELL
Luther WEEKS
Thomas WEEKS 2 (Jonathan 1) was born in Connecticut; came to Wyoming with the first two hundred settlers in 1769; was not in the Wyoming Massacre; married ?; lived in Wilkes-Barre near his brother Philip's place; was made guardian of Philip's children in 1788. The names of his children are uncertain, but they are supposed to be:
Lydia WEEKS
Abigail WEEKS
Elizabeth WEEKS, m. Nathan WALLER
Philip WEEKS 3 (Philip, 2 Jonathan 1) was born in Wilkes-Barre about 1774; was four years old when his father was killed in the massacre; his mother married Ishmael BENNETT, and about 1788 removed to Hanover, where Philip, Hulda, and Luther grew up; Philip married (1st) Amelia DURKEE, daughter of Captain DURKEE, who was killed in the Wyoming Massacre; removed to Oquago about 1804; married (2nd) ? CAMPBELL. They had a number of children, but their names are not known. 
Weeks, Phillip (I2844)
 
90 HISTORY OF HANOVER TOWNSHIP AND WYOMING VALLEY
Luzerne County, Pennsylvania
By: Henry Blackman Plumb, 1885, 498 pp.
Robert Baur, Printer and Stationer, Wilkes-Barre, PA
Compiled By: James H. Culbert
THE JONATHAN WEEKS FAMILY
CONTAINED IN THE HANOVER GENEALOGICAL TABLES TO 1830,
pp. 484-485
Jonathan WEEKS, came from Fairfield, Connecticut to Wyoming with his wife, Abigail, and two sons, Jonathan and Philip, in 1762-63; escaped the massacre of 1763; Philip and Thomas, his sons, came to Wyoming in 1769 with the first two hundred in the second attempt to settle the land; the father, with Jonathan and Bartholomew and two daughters, came soon afterward; in the battle of 3 Jul 1778, seven persons went out from his house to the battle - Philip, Jonathan, and Bartholomew, his sons, Silas BENEDICT, who married his granddaughter, Jabez BEERS (probably the father of Philip's wife), Josiah CARMAN, another relative, and Robert BATES, a boarder; the whole seven lay dead on the fatal field that night. His children were:
Jonathan WEEKS, b. ?, m. ?, d. 1778, slain in the Massacre
Philip WEEKS, b. ?, d. 1778, killed in the Massacre, m. Abigail BEERS
Bartholomew WEEKS, b. ?, m. ?, d. 1778, slain in the Massacre
Thomas WEEKS, b. ?, d. ? [before 1885], lived in Wilkes-Barre in 1788
Two daughters, m. ?
Jonathan WEEKS 2 (Jonathan 1) was born in Connecticut; came to Wyoming first in 1762-63; and finally in 1769-70; resided in Wilkes-Barre; married ?; was slain in the massacre of 3 Jul 1778. They had (the family of Jonathan is uncertain):
John WEEKS
Jersuha WEEKS
Sarah WEEKS
Joseph WEEKS
Benjamin WEEKS
Philip WEEKS 2 (Jonathan 1) was born in Connecticut; came to Wyoming first in 1762-63; and finally in 1769 with the first two hundred settlers; resided in the lower part of Wilkes-Barre on or near the present STURDEVANT place; married Abigail BEERS; was killed in the Wyoming Massacre of 3 Jul 1778; being called back out of the river by the promises of the Indians to spare his life, but as soon as he got out of the water they fell upon him with spear and tomahawk and killed him at the water's edge; they knew him; his house was about a mile below their town of Maughwauwama on the elevated flats or terrace. They had:
Lydia WEEKS, m. Silas BENEDICT
Hulda WEEKS, m. Comfort CAREY
Philip WEEKS, b. 1774, d. ? [before 1885], m. (1st) Amelia DURKEE, m. (2nd) ? CAMPBELL
Luther WEEKS
Thomas WEEKS 2 (Jonathan 1) was born in Connecticut; came to Wyoming with the first two hundred settlers in 1769; was not in the Wyoming Massacre; married ?; lived in Wilkes-Barre near his brother Philip's place; was made guardian of Philip's children in 1788. The names of his children are uncertain, but they are supposed to be:
Lydia WEEKS
Abigail WEEKS
Elizabeth WEEKS, m. Nathan WALLER
Philip WEEKS 3 (Philip, 2 Jonathan 1) was born in Wilkes-Barre about 1774; was four years old when his father was killed in the massacre; his mother married Ishmael BENNETT, and about 1788 removed to Hanover, where Philip, Hulda, and Luther grew up; Philip married (1st) Amelia DURKEE, daughter of Captain DURKEE, who was killed in the Wyoming Massacre; removed to Oquago about 1804; married (2nd) ? CAMPBELL. They had a number of children, but their names are not known. 
Weeks, Jonathan (I2845)
 
91 HISTORY OF HANOVER TOWNSHIP AND WYOMING VALLEY
Luzerne County, Pennsylvania
By: Henry Blackman Plumb, 1885, 498 pp.
Robert Baur, Printer and Stationer, Wilkes-Barre, PA
Compiled By: James H. Culbert
THE JONATHAN WEEKS FAMILY
CONTAINED IN THE HANOVER GENEALOGICAL TABLES TO 1830,
pp. 484-485
Jonathan WEEKS, came from Fairfield, Connecticut to Wyoming with his wife, Abigail, and two sons, Jonathan and Philip, in 1762-63; escaped the massacre of 1763; Philip and Thomas, his sons, came to Wyoming in 1769 with the first two hundred in the second attempt to settle the land; the father, with Jonathan and Bartholomew and two daughters, came soon afterward; in the battle of 3 Jul 1778, seven persons went out from his house to the battle - Philip, Jonathan, and Bartholomew, his sons, Silas BENEDICT, who married his granddaughter, Jabez BEERS (probably the father of Philip's wife), Josiah CARMAN, another relative, and Robert BATES, a boarder; the whole seven lay dead on the fatal field that night. His children were:
Jonathan WEEKS, b. ?, m. ?, d. 1778, slain in the Massacre
Philip WEEKS, b. ?, d. 1778, killed in the Massacre, m. Abigail BEERS
Bartholomew WEEKS, b. ?, m. ?, d. 1778, slain in the Massacre
Thomas WEEKS, b. ?, d. ? [before 1885], lived in Wilkes-Barre in 1788
Two daughters, m. ?
Jonathan WEEKS 2 (Jonathan 1) was born in Connecticut; came to Wyoming first in 1762-63; and finally in 1769-70; resided in Wilkes-Barre; married ?; was slain in the massacre of 3 Jul 1778. They had (the family of Jonathan is uncertain):
John WEEKS
Jersuha WEEKS
Sarah WEEKS
Joseph WEEKS
Benjamin WEEKS
Philip WEEKS 2 (Jonathan 1) was born in Connecticut; came to Wyoming first in 1762-63; and finally in 1769 with the first two hundred settlers; resided in the lower part of Wilkes-Barre on or near the present STURDEVANT place; married Abigail BEERS; was killed in the Wyoming Massacre of 3 Jul 1778; being called back out of the river by the promises of the Indians to spare his life, but as soon as he got out of the water they fell upon him with spear and tomahawk and killed him at the water's edge; they knew him; his house was about a mile below their town of Maughwauwama on the elevated flats or terrace. They had:
Lydia WEEKS, m. Silas BENEDICT
Hulda WEEKS, m. Comfort CAREY
Philip WEEKS, b. 1774, d. ? [before 1885], m. (1st) Amelia DURKEE, m. (2nd) ? CAMPBELL
Luther WEEKS
Thomas WEEKS 2 (Jonathan 1) was born in Connecticut; came to Wyoming with the first two hundred settlers in 1769; was not in the Wyoming Massacre; married ?; lived in Wilkes-Barre near his brother Philip's place; was made guardian of Philip's children in 1788. The names of his children are uncertain, but they are supposed to be:
Lydia WEEKS
Abigail WEEKS
Elizabeth WEEKS, m. Nathan WALLER
Philip WEEKS 3 (Philip, 2 Jonathan 1) was born in Wilkes-Barre about 1774; was four years old when his father was killed in the massacre; his mother married Ishmael BENNETT, and about 1788 removed to Hanover, where Philip, Hulda, and Luther grew up; Philip married (1st) Amelia DURKEE, daughter of Captain DURKEE, who was killed in the Wyoming Massacre; removed to Oquago about 1804; married (2nd) ? CAMPBELL. They had a number of children, but their names are not known. 
Weeks, Bartholomew (I2846)
 
92 HISTORY OF MORROW COUNTY CHAPTER XVIII Contributed by Rev. W. D. Peet CANAAN TOWNSHIP INTRODUCTION SETTLEMENT INDIAN INCIDENTS ROADS AND OTHER IMPROVEMENTS PIONEER LIFE EDUCATIONAL AND RELIGIOUS
The North Canaan Methodist Episcopal Church was first organized, in 1833, by the Rev. James Wilson. It was then merely a class of five members, over whom Mr. Jacob Geyer was appointed Class-Leader. In the year 1842, a protracted meeting was held at the home of Mr. Geyer, by the Rev. Mr. Sharp. This meeting resulted in a large number of accessions, and a more complete organization was made, with the following official board: Class-Leaders, Jacob Geyer, Jacob Harrison and John Campbell, Stewards, Abraham Foulk, Jacob Geyer and Richard Stime; Trustees, Abraham Foulk, Jacob Geyer, Jacob Harrison, S. Valentine and John Campbell. The first church edifice was of hewed logs, and erected in 1846. Prosperity marked the history of the church till 1861, when the old log building was superseded by a beautiful frame structure ; when in the act of raising the building, a part of the frame fell, and several workmen were caught beneath the falling timbers, and, though several were seriously hurt, yet no one was fatally injured. When the raising was going for ward, a neighbor drove up with a fast-trotting horse, and many of the by-standers were attracted out to the road to see him try his speed, and by this means were out of danger when the building fell. The work progressed, however, to completion, and was dedicated in the fall of the same year. Its value at the present time is estimated at $1,500. It is connected with the Caledonia Church, and with it forms what is known as the "Caledonia charge." For a country church, it is regarded as one of the most flourishing societies in this region of country. A Sunday school is here kept up the entire year, and Mr. N. A. Campbell is the present Superintendent. The church has a membership numbering eighty-four. Rev. C. Baldwin is the present Pastor, and the official board is as follows: Class-Leaders, Harrison Kenniman, S. Strawman, J. N. Campbell, Jacob Geyer and A. M. Smith - Stewards, Dr. C. Hahn, J. N. Campbell and Samuel Strawman; Trustees, John Campbell, S. Strawman, Robinson Geyer, A. M. Smith, H. Kenniman, Alfred Campbell and J. N. Campbell. 
Geyer, Jacob G (I577)
 
93 HISTORY OF MORROW COUNTY CHAPTER XVIII Contributed by Rev. W. D. Peet CANAAN TOWNSHIP INTRODUCTION SETTLEMENT INDIAN INCIDENTS ROADS AND OTHER IMPROVEMENTS PIONEER LIFE EDUCATIONAL AND RELIGIOUS
The North Canaan Methodist Episcopal Church was first organized, in 1833, by the Rev. James Wilson. It was then merely a class of five members, over whom Mr. Jacob Geyer was appointed Class-Leader. In the year 1842, a protracted meeting was held at the home of Mr. Geyer, by the Rev. Mr. Sharp. This meeting resulted in a large number of accessions, and a more complete organization was made, with the following official board: Class-Leaders, Jacob Geyer, Jacob Harrison and John Campbell, Stewards, Abraham Foulk, Jacob Geyer and Richard Stime; Trustees, Abraham Foulk, Jacob Geyer, Jacob Harrison, S. Valentine and John Campbell. The first church edifice was of hewed logs, and erected in 1846. Prosperity marked the history of the church till 1861, when the old log building was superseded by a beautiful frame structure ; when in the act of raising the building, a part of the frame fell, and several workmen were caught beneath the falling timbers, and, though several were seriously hurt, yet no one was fatally injured. When the raising was going for ward, a neighbor drove up with a fast-trotting horse, and many of the by-standers were attracted out to the road to see him try his speed, and by this means were out of danger when the building fell. The work progressed, however, to completion, and was dedicated in the fall of the same year. Its value at the present time is estimated at $1,500. It is connected with the Caledonia Church, and with it forms what is known as the "Caledonia charge." For a country church, it is regarded as one of the most flourishing societies in this region of country. A Sunday school is here kept up the entire year, and Mr. N. A. Campbell is the present Superintendent. The church has a membership numbering eighty-four. Rev. C. Baldwin is the present Pastor, and the official board is as follows: Class-Leaders, Harrison Kenniman, S. Strawman, J. N. Campbell, Jacob Geyer and A. M. Smith - Stewards, Dr. C. Hahn, J. N. Campbell and Samuel Strawman; Trustees, John Campbell, S. Strawman, Robinson Geyer, A. M. Smith, H. Kenniman, Alfred Campbell and J. N. Campbell. 
Harrison, Jacob (I638)
 
94 History of Morrow County Ohio - Canaan Twp. Page 738
GEORGE RICE, farmer; P. O., Caledonia. Jacob Rice, the father of George, figures very conspicuously in the history of this township, being one of the first settlers, and to give the history of Canaan Township without relating the experience of Jacob Rice, would be similar to seeing the play of Hamlet with the Prince of Denmark left out. John was born Aug. 27, 1826, on the east [1/2] of S. E. 1/4 of Section 7, in Canaan Tp. There were thirteen children, of which number, John ranked midway, being the seventh in order. At the usual age, John embarked for himself, and like many others of his time, had nothing but his hands to help him. At the age of 23, he was swept westward by the tidal wave of '49, remaining in the mines at Nevada about two years. Soon after his return home he married Elizabeth Ann Geyer, who was born in Muskingum Co., Ohio, in 1833, being the eldest daughter of Jacob and Ruth Geyer, who were among the staunch families in the township, and were located on Section 9. Since 1876 her father's remains have reposed in Canaan Cemetery; his wife yet survives him. Since the marriage of our subject, he has resided on the farm he now owns; he first lived several years in a cabin southwest of his present residence. Five children are the fruits of their union-Zeralda, now Mrs. J. Campbell; James B., Arminda J., now Mrs.G. W. Vallentine; George M. and Anna. His first purchase of land was 160 acres for $13.00 per acre, upon his return from California; he has now 302 acres, and made the greater part of the improvements. Is not a member of any church or order; is a Universalist in principle. 
Rice, George Melvin (I546)
 
95 HISTORY OF MORROW COUNTY PAGE 475
CANAAN TWP.
Canaan Township is located in the western part of Morrow County. It is bounded on the north and west by Marion County, and on the south and east by Gilead and Washington Townships of Morrow County, and is known in an early survey as Township 5 Range 17.
The history of this territory begins in the year 1821. It was in the spring of that year that Mr. Jacob Rice came from Greenfield, Fairfield Co., Ohio, prospecting for land and a home. He found an unbroken forest, a swamp, the Wyandot Indians, Mr. Comfort Olds, and Abraham G. Andrews. Mr. Andrews had entered land immediately south of the mound above described, just one week before, while Mr. Olds had taken possession only the day before of some land he had entered in the near vicinity. Mr. Andrews was sick of his bargain, and induced Mr. Rice to buy him out. This first sale of property, within the township, occasioned, on the part of Andrews, merely a ride from the land office in Delaware to the land itself, and the expense of executing and filing the deed. On this land Mr. Rice has always resided, though, at the present time, it is owned by his son. Here he built his cabin, while, on the adjoining quarter section, Mr. Olds was likewise busily engaged. They became acquainted with each other in the unbroken wilderness, Mr. Rice being led to where Mr. Olds was working, by the sound of his ax. They were neighbors, and must associate with each other, because there were no other neighbors within several miles. When Mr. Rice had completed his cabin, he returned to Fairfield County for his family. In August of this year, he gathered together the articles absolutely necessary, and moved into his new home. At that time, his family was composed of a wife and three small children, and, conveniences at hand, four days were occupied with the journey-a journey which now would hardly occupy four hours. This was the best season of the year for his purpose, as at this time the streams where so low they might be easily forded.
An illustration answering the Scriptural question, "Who is my neighbor? " is given of these early days, and is worthy a record where it; may not be obliterated. Mr. Olds was very poor and must have suffered for the necessaries of life had it not been for his stranger neighbor, Rice, who divided with him the supplies he was able to obtain, bringing them with him from Greenfield. There was no thought that any return would be made for these things, but a time of need brought about a possibility of restoration when it was especially appreciated. Mr. Olds removed to the plains in Marion County and put up a horse-mill. The sickly year came. The squirrels stole everything. Corn was worth $1 per bushel, and everything else in proportion. Mr. Rice went to the mill at, the plains, and obtained two bushels, for which Mr. Olds would receive no remuneration. Corn was too valuable to sell, but not to be given away to one who had proven himself "a friend in need."
During the same year came two other families and built cabins for homes in this wilderness, adjoining those occupied by Rice and Olds-Nathan Arnold and Asa Gordon. The following spring there were two more families-William Coonrad and Mr. Welsh. During the following summer came Matthew and Thomas Merritt, and settled in the central part of the town, calling the settlement "Denmark," the name by which the little village has since been known and called, although the post office which was located there, and kept by them, was then called, and has always been known, as Merritt Post Office.
Among the early settlers are found the names of Jeremiah Doughty, David Christy, Daniel Cooley and Zenas Leonard. Some of these remained and became part of, their lives woven in, the history of the township; while others moved away, and are forgotten by those who remain, in every respect save that they formerly lived here.
One other character still lives here who came among the very first settlers, who has exerted a greater influence in the township than probably any other-around whom the whole history of the township may be said to have crystallized-Mr. John Boyles. He was born near the State line, between Virginia and Pennsylvania, June 13, 1790. He was the son of Jonathan and Elizabeth (Hunt) Boyles, natives of the State of New Jersey. He first came to the State of Ohio in the fall of 1806, and settled in Knox County. He was a soldier in the war of 1812. During the summer of 1823, he came to Morrow (then Marion) County, and settled on a farm in Canaan Township. It contained a quarter-section of land, located in the near vicinity of Denmark, and now occupied by Mr. Christian Grover. The following spring township election presented some facts worthy of chronicling in this place; there were to be elected two Justices of the Peace, three Trustees, two Constables, one Town Clerk, one Treasurer, two Overseers of the Poor, and two Fence Viewers, and at that time there were but ten voters in the township. Comfort Olds, Matthew and Thomas Merritt acted as judges, while John Boyles and Jacob Rice were clerks. Of course, it was necessary that some of these should hold more than one office. At this time, the two clerks, John Boyles and Jacob Rice, were made Justices of the Peace. Mr. Boyles held this office eight years in succession. He was also made Town Clerk, and held this office for fourteen years, much of the time without remuneration, even furnishing his own stationery for the keeping of the records. This was the season for the Presidential campaign, always a season of excitement, but in this part of our great country it seems to have aroused but little interest. Only five votes were polled, and no majority appeared in the returns, since Messrs. Olds and Boyles voted for Clay, the two Merritts for Adams, and Mr. Rice for Jackson. The next Presidential campaign presents quite a contrast, since, out of the about thirty-five voters, there was about twenty-five majority for Jackson. In this year of grace, 1880, it is estimated that the majority for Garfield will be proportionately large in harmony with the increase in the township of the number of its voters.
We said Mr. Rice found, on his coming, the township inhabited with the Wyandot Indians. These were friendly, and not unfrequently were employed by the white settlers in clearing their land, log-rolling and the like. Mr. Rice tells of one Tom Lyons, "the homeliest old de'il you'd ever seen." His wife, however, was a marked contrast to himself, very fine looking, with hair "long enough to drag on the ground-" she was the envy of many a white woman, while Tom was exceeding proud of her, and treated her with the courtesy and respect accorded to the wife in Christian communities. A story is told concerning the birth of Matilda Merritt, now Mrs. Davis, the first white child born in the township, which may illustrate not only the friendliness of the Indians, but also the humanity in the heart of the 'race as a whole. Mrs. Merritt was alone, her husband and father in- law having gone to a raising. Two old squaws living near, discovered her in the midst of travail and pain ; they came to her relief, bringing their experience, and, with hearts full of sympathy, and kind and tender hands, performed the delicate service of midwives, in this her hour of sorrow.
In marked contrast to this is the story told by Mr. Wash Harris, who now resides in Denmark, in the house where his Grandfather Merritt used to live. He well remembers hearing his grandmother tell how she was left alone when a squad of Indians came to their cabin; they brought with them a number of scalps of white men, which they laid in a row upon the floor, and beside them placed the tongues of the whites, which they would count over in their Indian tongue, apparently gloating over them with savage vengeance. They left her, however, without molestation or attempted injury.
But pioneer life has many hardships and privations. At times, the pioneer must suffer for the necessaries of life but for the common humanity which leads the pioneer to divide his provisions with his more needy neighbor. We have seen how Mr. Rice was helped out of a close place by one whom he had relieved when in need. Mr. Boyles tells a similar incident: He had lost a part of his team, thus preventing his raising a crop, and exposing him to want, if not starvation. He had a friend in Knox County, who loaded him up with such things as people in pioneer life most need-powder, shot, flour, etc.-instructing him to trade with his fellows for skins of animals' they had shot. At other times, he would have suffered had he not been an expert hunter. Game was abundant, and his faithful rifle never failed him in his extremity. In numerous instances has he shot bears when in the act of stealing a "Porker."
At this time, there was but one road through I the township, and in very truth it might be said to have been all over town, since the shortest way to Mount Gilead was the one chosen till that one became so badly cut up as to make it impassable, when it became necessary to go farther round. However, there was one which might, by a stretch of fancy, be dignified by the name of a road. It was part of an army trail and "blazed " from Chesterville to Upper Sandusky. But, of course, roads are a necessity, and Mr. Boyles was appointed by his fellows to secure the assistance of the County Commissioners. They entered into a contract to prepare half of the road on condition that he prepare the other half. He went out morning before breakfast and secured the promise of twenty-one men to do twenty-one days' work. In one day, these men cut the road through the entire township, removing all the underbrush and smaller trees. This is quite different from the road-building of to-day. The road spoken of is known as the State road, and was then employed as the mail route. There were no bridges in those days, and at the time of high water people must stay at home, waiting patiently till the waters subsided, or ford a muddy river almost all the way to their destination. Three men, John Boyles, Matthew Merritt and Zenas Leonard, cut the first road running through the township from Claridon, on the west, to the southeast corner. All these contrast painfully with the pikes that traverse the township now in every direction, with good substantial structures bridging the streams at every crossing; but then a road was a road, even though it was but an opening through the dense forest. It made a hole through which the sunlight could penetrate, furnished a way out to, and communication with, the world outside, let civilization enter, and prepared the way for the present successes which are but a prophecy of grander achievements in the future.
Among the later revivals--1827-we find the names of Thomas Patton, William Feigley and James McKeever. Mr. Patton was born in Ireland in 1787. On coming to America he entered land in this township, and upon his arrival at Mansfield, it was necessary to secure a guide to the land he had entered-blazing their way as they went. From their experience, we learn the struggles, hardships and dangers incident to pioneer life. Mr. Patton was very poor, so much so he could not secure many of the real necessities of life. He hadn't even a team at the time of his coming. This made it necessary to pack many things upon their backs. He raised a pair of steers from the cows he brought I with him-waiting till they were grown-employing his time in clearing his land and fencing it. His cabin was built near a spring, and at one time his wife went after a pail of water, was lost in the woods, and, after wandering round for some time, was at length led home by the cries of her infant child. Later, Joseph Patton and his sisters were left by their father to finish hoeing a patch of corn. This kept them busily employed till after dark, when at length they were startled by the howling wolves not far away, which was responded to by two other packs of those savage beasts in opposite directions. They heard the tramping of their feet, and not unfrequently saw their eyes -glistening through the dark-their incessant howlings making the woods hideous the while. Their father beard those frightful bowls, rushed into his cabin, seized his gun, and hastened out to the rescue of his children thus exposed to danger, firing as he went. He was just in time. They were hardly rescuedhad hardly reached a place of safety-ere they beard the wolves howling their disappointment.
On another occasion, when Joseph Patton and his father were working in the woods, they saw, not far away, a huge drove of wild hogs approaching. They had only time to climb into some trees when the swine scented them, and rushed madly to their place of refuge. They tore the bark off these trees with their tushes, and tore down all the bushes and saplings in the near vicinity, apparently maddened with disappointment in not securing their prey.
Mr. McKeever, a native of Pennsylvania, of Irish descent, came to Canaan in 1827, on an exploring tour. The country pleased him so well that, on returning to Pennsylvania, he immediately sent his family out, remaining behind to earn the necessary funds-$60 he had borrowed for this purpose. He worked five months at 84.50 per month, and then had his leg broken by the kick of a horse. He now borrowed more money, to enable him to come to his Western home, and soon after paid the entire debt by splitting rails at 37 1/2 cents per hundred, and clearing land at $2.50 per acre, cutting all the trees less than eighteen inches in diameter, and burning the brush. William Feigley came soon after, walking all the way from Pennsylvania, and entered land adjoining that owned by McKeever.
The milling privileges of the township have always been exceedingly limited, and at the present time it is difficult to decide which was first in the order of building, to say nothing at all of the time of erection. In an early day, it was necessary to go to Mount Vernon to get wheat ground, as now it is necessary to go beyond the boundaries of the township for milling of any character. Mr. Boyles rigged up a rough structure run by horse power for the grinding of corn, and with it was able to grind twelve or fifteen bushels per day. But a mill of such description would not be employed longer than circumstances made it a necessity, but in that early day it was regarded a., a great convenience. Probably the first saw-mill run by water power was built on the Middle Fork of the Whetstone, about 1825, by one William Shaffer. It was run by several different parties but soon run down. Mr. Rice also built a sawmill, about 1833, on the Middle Fork of the Whetstone, but four years later he moved to the South Fork, where he ran it till 1851, and the ruins of it may still be found. But Canaan is essentially a firming district. The soil is too rich to be encumbered with mills when these are so convenient in the adjoining township, and farming pays too well for any one to engage in anything else. Of course these intelligent farmers know the worth of such advantages and are able to appreciate their value, but they can stand upon the boundaries of their extremely fertile township and see the smoke-stacks of saw and grist mill, so that these are sufficiently convenient for all practical purposes.
TOWNSHIP HISTORIES. CHAPTER I. THE VILLAGE OF MARION-MARION TOWNSHIP PAGE 494 - J. R. GARBERSON MARION TOWNSHIP. - 495
In other parts of town were the following: Alexander Berry, Justice of the Peace, resided near the southeast corner of the village. Charles Baker lived in a frame house where J. S. Reed's residence is now. The old horse mill stood nearly opposite the present residence of John J. Williams. The latter place was occupied by a large hewed-log house, built by Rev. Baker, the most of it being erected by himself alone. The Sheriff occupied a building adjoining the jail. John Baker lived in a hewed-log house, where McNeal & Wolford's office now stands. The latter is in fact the same building, turned around and re-modeled by Judge Bowen. John O'Harra lived on the corner of Center and West streets. The Methodist parsonage was on Dr. Sweney's west lot; it was of hewed logs. Near the corner of West and Silver streets, Jacob Rice had a little distillery and horse- mill, and a residence a short distance south. Dr. Holloway's frame dwelling was where Henry True now resides. Mrs. Baughman lived in a log house where Mr. Painter was living a few years ago, and her son Michael in a small cabin near the east line of what was Judge Bennett's pasture, south of Mr. Ryan's.
This distillery was of the old copper-worm order, and west of and attached to it was a horse mill, to aid in the preparation of the mash, and on the north that other necessary appendage, a hog pen. Within and in close proximity to the ditch, but separated from it by an open stone wall, was the well from which was obtained the water for the mash. This well was about five feet wide and four feet deep, and afforded the necessary amount of water for all practical purposes, as it was regularly replenished from the ditch. This establishment was under the supervision of the same John O'Harra that carried on the chair shop above mentioned, on Center street, but by another man as de facto operator, by the name of Randall Tyler, the memory of whom, doubtless, still lingers in the minds of some citizens.
In the spring of 1829, our old pioneer friend, Jacob Rice, from Shepherdstown, Va., succeeded to the possession and control of those premises, and continued for several years; when he left and went West, to 'grow up with the country,' and that was an' end to the distillery businesss in that location. But the dwelling house remained and formed a residence for W. G. Johnson for several years, and the main building of the distillery remained standing until 1847, when the writer of this paid $3 for it, took it down and converted a .part of it into lintels in the erection of a brick house, and disposed of the rest for divers purposes.
Jacob Rice ran the first horse-mill.

Marion Daily Star 1880 September 4
The venerable Jacob Rice, of Caledonia, was in town today. He is 89 years of age and quite well and lively. He came to Fairfield County, Ohio in 1799, and moved to Marion County in 1821, being the first settler in Canaan township, now Morrow County. In 1823 he raised a fine crop of corn, which was all eaten by an army of squirrels in less than three days. His reminiscences of early days are very interesting. 
Rice, Jacob (I539)
 
96 History of Morrow County, Canaan Twp. Page 736
JOHN PITMAN, farmer; P. O., Caledonia; born in Monroe Co., Ohio, March 17, 1823; he was a son of John, whose father's name was William. John Pitman, the father of our subject, came to this county with his father about the year 1839, and remained until his death; John, Jr.,remained with his father until some time after he was of age; his father having a large farm, his services were required at home; by going oil bail for his friends, he lost all his land, consisting of 400 acres, and had to start anew. After this financial reverse, John accompanied his father to Delaware Co., and rented land, until 1850; he then came to this township, locating in the northeast part of the same, where he purchased 160 acres of land, and lived on it until his father's death, which occurred in 1873; his wife preceded him two years. At the age of 35 John was married to Lydia Rice, who was born in this township, in July,1840; she is a daughter of Jacob Rice, one of the old pioneers of the county. After the marriage of Mr. Pitman, he settled oil Section 7, and lived there until 1875; he then moved across into Section 6, which has since been his permanent home. He has 1.38 acres of land, which is under good culture, and well-improved. They have six children living, Orlendo, Franklin, James, Mary I, Alice and Ada. 
Pittman, John Jr (I590)
 
97 History of The Ohio Falls Cities and Their Counties Vol. II published by L. A. Williams & Co. 1882
Samuel McKinley was born April 27, 1836 in Wood Township, and has always resided in the county. His father, James McKinley came from Kentucky to Indiana in 1810 or 1812. Mr. Samuel McKinley is engaged in a tannery at New Providence. He was married in 1858 to Miss Louisa Schleicher, of Clark County. They have ten children. Mr. and Mr. McKinley are members of the Christian Church.
Baird's History of Clark County 1909 pages 545 -546
The name of McKinley has of late years assumed something of a historic significance in this land of ours for it is linked in the public memory with the remembrance of a martyred President. It is but fitting that this should be so. And yet the family name and traditions go back beyond that towering figure of recent years, across the Atlantic and across the centuries, to find an ancestor of distinction and merit. The first to emerge out of the twilight of tradition with a definite record is the figure of a Scotch Covenanter, who, when the vicissitudes of the times made it necessary for him, went from his native land across to Ireland; thence in after years to the United States. Two of his sons, David and James McKinley, settled in Shelby County, Kentucky, and came in after years to the spot in Clark County, Indiana, where Borden now stands. David shortly after went northward to South Bend, and thence to Canton, Ohio, while James remained and made Wood Township his future home. David McKinley, as may be surmised, was the great-grandfather of President McKinley. James McKinley reared six sons: James, John, Thomas, William, Jeremiah and Alexander. The first named son, James, was the father of the subject of our sketch [Samuel McKinley]. James married Jincy Packwood, a native of Virigina, the daughter of Samuel Packwood. Samuel McKinley had eleven children, of whom nine are yet living. They are: Edward, Fred, Charles and Albert McKinley, and Mrs. Kate Minton, Mrs. Blanch Bell, Mrs. Lillie Bere, Mrs. Nettie Byerly, and Julia McKinley, all living in Borden with the exception of the three married sisters. Mrs. Kate Minton lives in Georgetown, Floyd County; Mrs. Blanche Bell lives in Jeffersonville, and the other married sisters in Louisville.
Samuel McKinley was born in Borden in 1836 and still resides at the family homestead. The tanyard, where he worked at his trade as a tanner, was first the property of his father. At a later period it belonged to an elder brother, and in 1866 our subject bought it and conducted a steady business there until 1907, when ill health caused him to retire from the tanning business. Though advanced in years, he is still active and deals very profitably in hides and furs. He is a prominent member of the Christian church and a man of importance in local affairs.
"Samuel McKinley married Louise Scheicher, who was born of French parentage in Louisiana. Her father was Louis Scheicher, a native of the old province of France--Alsace-Lorraine; her mother, Catherine Scheicher, was also born in France.
"On June 9, 1870, a son, Albert, was born to Samuel McKinley and wife 
McKinley, Samuel (I1977)
 
98 Holland, Jesse
Private - Company A
Buried in Pine Level Baptist Church Cemetery, County Road 33, north of Blue Springs AL - grave marker inscribed: "Jesse Holland / Pvt., Co A, 37th Ala. / Born 3 Apr 1836 - Died 18 May 1908" (age 72 years)

Holland, Jesse
Private
Company A
Age at Enlistment: ca 26
POW at Corinth MS 3-5 Oct 1862 and forwarded to Columbus KY for exchange on 9 Oct 1862; Received at or near Vicksburg MS aboard steamer Dacotah with 539 POWs and declared exchanged 8 Nov 1862; Captured/Paroled at Vicksburg (NEED TO LOOK FOR HIS RECORD AT VICKSBURG); POW at Graysville GA on 27 Nov 63 and sent to Nashville, Louisville and on to Rock Island Prison IL; Transferred: Naval rendezvous at Camp Douglas on 5 Feb 1864; Enlisted in U.S. Navy on 25 Jan 1864 to get out of prison - served duration of war aboard USS Circassian; Brother to John Holland (Company A); Brother to Spenser Holland (Company A); Born 3 Apr 1836 - Died 18 May 1908 according to gravemarker for "Jesse Holland, Pvt., Co A, 37th Ala." located in Pine Level Baptist Church Cemetery, County Road 33, north of Blue Springs AL 
Holland, Jesse Jr (I998)
 
99 Holland, John
Private
Company A
Age at Enlistment: 28
Enlisted 22 March 1862 at Auburn AL by J.F. Dowdell; Listed as Private on Muster Roll of Company A dated 13 May 1862 at Auburn AL; WIA at Corinth MS/Died of wounds at Oxford MS 11 or 14 Nov 1862 and buried there 14 Nov 1862; Claim for deceased soldier filed 27 Jan 1863 by Mary Ann Holland and paid $32.53 on 15 Oct 1863; Son-in-Law to Emanuel Antley (Company A) (Holland married Mary Ann [Polly] Antley); Brother-in-Law to Benjamin Albert Forrester (Co A); Brother to Jesse Holland (Company A); Brother to Spenser Holland (Company A)

October 5, 1862 - The 37th Alabama is engaged at the "Hatchie Bridge"
Army of Tennessee: Major General Earl Van Dorn, Commanding
1st Division: Brigadier General Martin E. Green
4th Brigade*: Colonel Robert McLain
37th Alabama & 36th Mississippi: Colonel W. W. Witherspoon


Between 7:30 and 8 a.m. - Van Dorn?s force runs headlong into Union Major General Stephen A. Hurlbut?s 4th Brigade. Reinforced by Ord, who takes command of the now-combined Union forces, Van Dorn and Price?s men are pushed back about five miles to the Hatchie River and back across the Bridge.

After accomplishing this, Ord is wounded and Hurlbut assumes command. While Price?s men (including the 37th Alabama) are hotly engaged with Ord?s force, Van Dorn?s scouts look for and find another crossing of the Hatchie River. Van Dorn then leads his army back to Holly Springs, Mississippi. Ord has forced Price to retreat, but the Confederates again escape capture or destruction.

Known Deaths from the Actions at Corinth and at the Hatchie Bridge
- Private Stephen Eason (Company B) KIA - October 3 (Corinth)
- Private John W. Elmore (Company H) KIA - October 4
- Private Benjamin Harral (Company C) DOW
- Private John Holland (Company A) DOW
- Captain James M. Kendrick (Company D) KIA - October 4/5 (Hatchie Bridge)
- Private George W. King (Company A) DOW - November 14 from Corinth wounds
- Captain Warner W. Meadows (Company G) KIA - October 4
- Private George C. Parmer (Company A) KIA - October 3 (Corinth)
- Private S. Sims (Company C) - Died of currently unknown cause, his body forwarded to Confederate Authorities on October 9
- Private James M. Smith (Company I) KIA - October 5 (Hatchie Bridge)
- Private John L. Hilson (Company A) Died of disease on the retreat march - October 5 at Ripley MS
- Private William A. Gillmore (Company I) DOW - died following procedure amputating an arm.


Van Dorn?s headquarters at Holly Springs, Mississippi, becomes the base of operations for the Army of Tennessee for the fall and winter. The 37th Alabama is posted to Grenada, Mississippi, approximately 60 miles to the south. 
Holland, John (I1100)
 
100 Idaho Marriages, 1842-1996
Name: Roy McKinley
Gender: Male
Spouse: Addie Woorhies
Spouse Gender: Female
Marriage Date: Feb 21, 1903
Marriage Location: Wallace, Shoshone CO., Idaho
Source: This record can be found in the marriage book at the County Courthouse located in Shoshone Co., ID in Volume 3 on Page 24. 
Family F1869
 

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